Zayn Malik is a beautiful starfish

I love Zayn Malik with the fire of a thousand suns, and his hair is really dreamy and his cheekbones are beautiful and he means a lot to me. One of my very good friends recently got me a Zayn doll and he’s hanging out in my living room, on one side the awkward adolescent doing publicity shots and on the other side the grown-up stubble-y … Continue reading Zayn Malik is a beautiful starfish

Community can’t be built on exclusion and erasure

As is quickly becoming tradition post-terrorist attack, the very early aftermath of the Paris attacks has ushered in an outpouring of solidarity. with world monuments being lit up with the colours of the French flag, #PrayforParis trending worldwide as a global community comes to together to share in the horror and sadness of these shocking attacks. Facebook has activated a check-in system for people to check in … Continue reading Community can’t be built on exclusion and erasure

The demonised and dehumanised brown Muslim

Since 9/11 the ‘war on terror’ has spiralled and coalesced into a stand-alone culture where ‘terrorist’ has come to mean brown and/or Muslim. Actually being Muslim isn’t enough sometimes with plenty of people with brown skin, regardless of religion, have been harassed on the street because racists aren’t too down with accuracy. When defining a term it can be more useful to conceptualise what it … Continue reading The demonised and dehumanised brown Muslim

Being working class at university

The latest budget cuts eradicated maintenance grants for all students, which, combined with astronomical tuition fees makes it an even more daunting task for working class people to embark on a university degree. I graduated from the University of Sheffield with a degree in English Literature in 2013, and again from the University of Sussex this year with an MA in Gender Studies. I’m due … Continue reading Being working class at university

Judging Book Covers: the Construction of Muslim Women

9/11 saw an influx in popularity of novels about Muslim women and, inevitably, white Western women writing a large portion of them. It’s become a trend amongst publishers to depict veiled women whose faces are further obscured by convenient shadows or coy glances. Cherry Moteshar’s “Unveiled,” is representative of the type of narrative and attitudes undertaken in writing Muslim and/or Middle Eastern women. The tagline … Continue reading Judging Book Covers: the Construction of Muslim Women

State Sponsored Islamophobia

Islamophobia as State Racism (Othering) Houria Boutelja classified Islamophobia as state racism in an essay for Decolonial Translation, stating: “I don’t believe it makes sense to characterize Islamophobia as a “feeling.” The terms “representation” and “imaginary” are often used, even as Islamophobia is institutionalized. In fact, there are Islamophobic laws…To speak of Islamophobia as sentiment is a euphemism. Islamophobia is first and foremost state racism…Such … Continue reading State Sponsored Islamophobia

My feminism is useless if it isn’t accessible

I learnt my feminism from my English Literature degree. The more Virginia Woolf, Zora Neale Hurston, Angela Carter, Gayatri Spivak and Helene Cixous I read, the more I became invested in feminism. I’m going to go ahead and put it out there that that isn’t how most people come to feminism. I was lucky enough to be able to go to university and have those … Continue reading My feminism is useless if it isn’t accessible